Prevalence of depressive symptoms due to COVID-19 and associated factors among healthcare workers in Southern Ethiopia

July 14, 2021

Zelalem Jabessa Wayessa, Girma Tufa Melesse, Elias Amaje Hadona, Wako Golicha Wako

SAGE Open Medicine

Healthcare workers around the world are at higher risk of developing mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examines the prevalence of COVID-19 related depression and associated symptoms among healthcare workers in the West Guji zone, Oromia region of Ethiopia. Researchers conducted a public health facility-based cross-sectional study with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and a sample selection of 283 following calculations. Overall, 275 healthcare workers participated with 62.9% male respondents, mean age of 29.83 years old, 73.1% living in urban areas, and 55.6% married. Depressive symptoms were identified in 21.5% of the population, or 59 participants. Researchers conducted binary logistic regression to identify factors significantly associated with increased depression, which included age, family size, alcohol use, medical illness, and training and knowledge on COVID-19. Being 25-29 years significantly increased odds of developing depression by 2.35 compared with those who are 35+. Four or more family members was 3.56 times more likely to develop depression than someone living alone. Alcohol use was 4.31 times more likely than no use. Medical illness increased odds 9.56 times compared to no illness. Training on COVID-19 decreased depression by 63%. Poor knowledge on COVID-19 was 15.34 times more likely to develop depression compared to those with good knowledge. Researchers argue these results should be used to develop prevention plans and interventions to reduce the incidence of depression in healthcare workers in the West Guji zone.

Wayessa ZJ, Melesse GT, Amaje Hadona E, Wako WG. Prevalence of depressive symptoms due to COVID-19 and associated factors among healthcare workers in Southern Ethiopia. SAGE Open Medicine. January 2021.

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