The COVID-19 Pandemic Introduces Diagnostic and Treatment Planning Complexity for Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

July 14, 2021

Vijay A Mittal, Elaine F Walker, Gregory P Strauss

Journal of Psychoses and Related Disorders

Researchers discussed difficulties in identifying and diagnosing clinical profiles in three clinical high-risk identification and prevention programs for psychosis. They argue that understanding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychosis is important to aid with targeted interventions and prevention methods. Researchers found that the effects of the pandemic differed, but that stress, isolation, and existential crises related to the pandemic have either positively or negatively impacted psychopathology. Furthermore, increased use of technology during the pandemic has increased anxiety, depression, stigma, suspicion, and ideas of reference. In contrast, other individuals have had a positive impact where social isolation helped reduce stress and hallucinations. Researchers advocate for new treatment planning and evaluation metrics that take into account experiences during the pandemic and the heterogeneity of psychosis.

Mittal VA, Walker EF, Strauss GP. The COVID-19 Pandemic Introduces Diagnostic and Treatment Planning Complexity for Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis. Schizophr Bull 2021; published online July 14.

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